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This edition: February 2002 edition





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Episode Details

Original tape date: February 15, 2002.

(mm:ss) indicates time position of each program segment, where appropriate.

The Middle Passage

Lamentably, for several hundred years Europeans and Africans conspired to create the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade. Admirably today, Europeans and Africans, French and American, are creating works of art to chronicle and memorialize the experience. A recent example of magnificent cooperation is the film The Middle Passage directed by Guy Deslauriers and co-written by award winning French novelist Patrick Chamoiseau. A special new version of the film produced by HBO and rewritten for English speaking audiences by award winning American novelist Walter Mosley represents the best of transatlantic cultural exchange.

Esther Kahn (1:10”)

Another Phoenix rises. This time it's Summer Phoenix, sister of actor Joaquin Phoenix. She takes the lead role in Esther Kahn, a lush costume drama of life on the British stage at the close of the 19th century. Directed in English by French filmmaker Arnaud Desplecin, the film shows how a shy Jewish girl of London is transformed by the theater. The young leading lady talks to CANAPE about the role.

Henri Salvador (6:26”)

Born in 1917 in Cayenne, French Guiana, Henri Salvador has been entertaining the world with his mixture of Parisian, Brazilian, and French Antillean rhythms for as long as his fellow octogenarians of The Buena Vista Social Club. But while they look back to a golden age of Cuban music, he looks forward to his next melody, his next engagement with a new musical idea. His latest CD Chambre Avec Vue was a hit in France last year and now reaches the USA. The effervescent master talks with CANAPE about the art of living and singing.

Court Metrages (11:35”)

In France they call them court metrages, short films. These works aren't just shorter than normal movies but require a different mastery of form. The Clermont-Ferran International Short Film Festival in France is dedicated to preserving and celebrating that difference in all of its manifestations. Recently, a group of award winning international films from the festival have been touring American university campuses. Roger Gonin, a member of the festival's programming team, chats with CANAPE about what these works can show us about the medium of film and our view of the world.

Harriet Chessman (17:05”)

Pigeon holed long ago as “the painter of mothers and children,” Mary Cassatt, who was born in America but long resided in France, has been the subject of serious reevaluation in the past twenty five years. Numerous exhibits and critical studies - many undertaken by women scholars -- have identified her as a important bridge between the French and American art worlds of the late nineteenth century. Now, in the lyrical novel Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper, American writer Harriet Chessman explores the Cassatt family from the angle of fiction. The author talks to CANAPE about the fascination of Cassatt and the Impressionist age.

Guest List

Harriet Scott Chessman Novelist

Roger Gonin Representative, Clermont Ferrand Festival

Summer Phoenix Actress

Henri Salvador Singer