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This edition: February 2004 edition





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Episode Details

Original tape date: February 18, 2004.

The Promised Life
Was there ever a French cinema without Isabelle Huppert? It could seem not. Still less than fifty years old, the versatile actress has made more than seventy-five movies in the past twenty-five years. Her roles have ranged from noblewoman to servant, from innocent to decadent. This time around in The Promised Life directed by Olivier Dahan she's a prostitute on the run with her daughter. CANAPE talks with the busy actress about getting so much done so well.

Fashioning the Modern Woman
Clothes may make the woman, but it wasn't until between the World Wars that clothes were made for the modern woman; indeed, helped make the woman modern. A new exhibit at the museum of the Fashion Institute of Technology explores how fashion changed to allow women larger, more flexible roles in social and professional life. On view are items from Coco Chanel, Madeleine Vionnet, and others. Curator and fashion historian Valerie Steele gives CANAPE a lesson in the role of female couturieres in the modern women's movement.

Arnold Antonin
2004 marks the bicentennial of the Haitian revolution, the only slave revolt in world history successful in founding a nation. In the past fifty years Haiti has once again come to the world's attention for another improbable reason: its striking tradition of visual arts. Teacher, social activist, and filmmaker Arnold Antonin dedicates his creative energies to preserving and promoting this remarkable art. He talks to CANAPE about capturing with the moving image the beauties of Haitian culture and art.
Impressionist Cats & Dogs
A dog strides across a bridge. A cat nestles next to a pot of geraniums. Two little girls sit relaxed with the family dog. What do all these pets have in common? They are all illustrations in the new study Impressionist Cats and Dogs by James H. Rubin. The great 19th century French painters and their subjects were no less enamored of their domestic animals than we are. Professor Rubin tells CANAPE about the “pet” interests of some of the world's most popular artists.

Vicky Colombet
In 1982 Vicky Colombet decided to leave her successful design firm to dedicate herself to painting. 2004 finds the French artist living and working in New York. Her most recent work is part of a group exhibit at the Haim Chanin Fine Arts Gallery whose theme is winds. “Blending wax and oil,” one curator observes, Colombet plays with our eye.” She does not “simply depict Nature; she tries to imitate its actions.” The artist shares her work with CANAPE.

Guest List

Arnold Antonin Film Director

Vicky Colombet Artist

Isabelle Huppert Actress

James H. Rubin Author

Valerie Steele Chief Curator, Fashion Institute of Technology, NYC